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Homemade Beef Bouillon Powder Recipe

Home­made Beef Bouil­lon is a sim­ple 5‑minute recipe that will change the way you sea­son your favorite dish­es. This deli­cious uma­mi sea­son­ing is com­plete­ly veg­an and gluten free.

Homemade Beef Bouillon Powder in a glass apothecary jar.  The lid is off and a heaping Tablespoon of Bouillon powder is sitting on the concrete countertop in front of the jar.  Fantastic Umami Seasoning.
Post may con­tain affil­i­ate links. See my Affil­i­ate Disclosure.

My beef bouil­lon recipe will eas­i­ly replace com­mer­cial beef bouil­lon in your favorite recipes. There are no fillers or anti-clump­ing agents. And, there’s no MSG! 

I’ve men­tioned in pre­vi­ous posts that my hus­band has a light aller­gic reac­tion when he eats MSG, so I have devel­oped my own sea­son­ings and blends to avoid that com­mon ingredient. 

I use it to make onion soup mix and to sea­son my slow cook­er roast beef or easy roast beef gravy. It makes fan­tas­tic onion dip for chips and veg­gies, too. 

Homemade Beef Bouillon Powder in a glass apothecary jar. The lid is off and a heaping Tablespoon of Bouillon powder is sitting on the concrete countertop in front of the jar.  Fantastic Umami Seasoning.

The Name

Even though there is no beef in my beef bouil­lon pow­der, I use it to replace beef bouil­lon in recipes. Just as my chick­en bouil­lon pow­der con­tains no chick­en, but is a mar­velous veg­an sub­sti­tute for chick­en bouil­lon.

I decid­ed to call it Beef Bouil­lon because that’s what I’m using it to replace. Some might call it Uma­mi Sea­son­ing or Uma­mi Pow­der, but that name isn’t as imme­di­ate­ly famil­iar here in the U.S.

I want­ed the name to be one that’s easy to rec­og­nize and remem­ber. So, that’s how my Beef Bouil­lon Pow­der came to be named.

Homemade Beef Bouillon Powder in a glass apothecary jar. The lid is off and a heaping Tablespoon of Bouillon powder is sitting on the concrete countertop in front of the jar.  Fantastic Umami Seasoning.

An Umami Definition

Believe it or not, I think the best def­i­n­i­tion I’ve read comes from Web­MD, “Uma­mi is the savory or meaty taste of foods.” 

For me, it is that deeply rich and savory fla­vor that we enjoy in the best com­fort food dish­es. My beef bouil­lon recipe def­i­nite­ly is with­out a doubt a scrump­tious uma­mi seasoning.

Uma­mi is con­sid­ered to be the fifth taste, added to sweet, sour, bit­ter and salty. It’s a Japan­ese word that trans­lates to “savory”.

The fla­vor com­po­nent comes from glu­ta­mates that are nat­u­ral­ly occur­ring in both meat and plant ingre­di­ents. If you’re inter­est­ed in a lit­tle more info on how those tell your brain about fla­vor, I rec­om­mend read­ing What is Uma­mi? over on Web MD.

Homemade Beef Bouillon Powder in a glass apothecary jar. The lid is off and a heaping Tablespoon of Bouillon powder is sitting on the concrete countertop in front of the jar.  Fantastic Umami Seasoning.

Ingredients That Create Umami Flavor

When I cre­ate recipes that I want to be deeply, rich­ly dark and savory, there are ingre­di­ents I instinc­tive­ly reach for.
Onions are the first. And yet, sci­en­tif­i­cal­ly onions are not high in glu­ta­mates, so on their own are not real­ly cre­at­ing the depth of uma­mi I want­ed in my beef bouil­lon recipe.

I knew mush­rooms were high in uma­mi and I’ve been using mush­room pow­der as a potent uma­mi sea­son­ing for some time, now. I per­son­al­ly don’t care for the tex­ture of mush­rooms, so find­ing the dehy­drat­ed mush­room pow­der [affil­i­ate link] was a great fla­vor boost for many of my recipes. It was def­i­nite­ly going to go into my home­made beef bouil­lon /umami seasoning.

I also thought about herbs that I use when cook­ing beef and want­ed to include those, as well. And salt was def­i­nite­ly going to be includ­ed as the strong fla­vor enhancer that it is. And gar­lic. I put gar­lic in every­thing. lol

It turns out that gar­lic is anoth­er uma­mi cre­ator. It is low­er in glu­ta­mates than oth­er intense­ly uma­mi foods though. After a lit­tle more research about uma­mi, I land­ed on a group of strong uma­mi ingre­di­ents that I believe have real­ly cre­at­ed the most deli­cious gluten free and veg­an beef bouil­lon /umami sea­son­ing I have ever eaten.

Here’s what I used.

Ingredients for beef bouillon in a smoothie blender cup, ready to be blended.  Mushroom Powder, Tomato Powder, Fine Sea Salt, Tamari Powder, Nutritional Yeast, Onion Powder, Garlic Powder, Mustard Powder, Oregano, Black Pepper, Thyme, Celery Seed, Red Pepper Flakes and Bay Leaf.  Fantastic Umami Seasoning.

The Ingredients

At first glance, the list seems long. But, keep in mind that most are herbs and spices you already have in your pantry. Three might be new to you, but will so change the way you sea­son food that I think it’s worth them becom­ing pantry staples. 

  • Mush­room Pow­der (explo­sive uma­mi fla­vor) See my descrip­tion, below.
  • Toma­to Pow­der (not the same as toma­to bouil­lon) See my descrip­tion, below.
  • Fine Sea Salt Any type should work as long as it’s fine­ly ground.
  • Tamari Pow­der (crit­i­cal to uma­mi fla­vor and keep­ing it gluten free) See my descrip­tion, below.
  • Nutri­tion­al Yeast If you fol­low my recipes, this one will be more famil­iar. See my descrip­tion, below.
  • Onion Pow­der
  • Gar­lic Powder
  • Mus­tard Powder
  • Oregano
  • Black Pep­per
  • Thyme
  • Cel­ery Seed
  • Red Pep­per Flakes
  • Bay Leaf

What is Mushroom Powder?

black table top covered in dried mushrooms with 4 white ceramic spoons.  Each spoon contains a different variety of mushroom powder.

Mush­rooms have that deeply earthy, almost meaty fla­vor when cooked and they are loaded with uma­mi. When dried, that fla­vor is super-con­cen­trat­ed. Then the mush­rooms are ground into pow­der for use in your favorite dishes.

For some­one like me, who does­n’t han­dle the tex­ture of mush­rooms well, mush­room pow­der is an impor­tant ingre­di­ent in fla­vor­ing savory dish­es. It’s def­i­nite­ly inte­gral to the deli­cious uma­mi fla­vor of my beef bouil­lon recipe. 

I pur­chased Shi­take mush­room pow­der on Ama­zon [affil­i­ate link], and you can also get Porci­ni mush­room pow­der at Spices, Inc., as well. I like both and often mix them. There are tons of vari­eties, though. So, choose the type of mush­rooms you like best or do a com­bi­na­tion of them for this beef bouil­lon recipe.

Check labels to be sure what you buy is only 100% mush­rooms, no additives.

What is Tomato Powder?

tomato powder in a glass jar, sitting on a black counter with some fresh cut tomatoes strewn about.

Toma­to Pow­der [affil­i­ate link] is exact­ly what you would expect. Toma­toes are dehy­drat­ed at the peak of ripeness and then ground into a pow­der for use in cook­ing. This prac­tice has actu­al­ly been going on for many cen­turies. It was just a new idea to me.

Toma­toes are so com­mon­ly added into beef dish­es to inten­si­fy the meaty uma­mi fla­vor. It only makes sense to include it in my veg­an beef bouil­lon recipe.

This is not the same as the toma­to bouil­lon (Cal­do de Tomat) that I use in my 10-Minute Mex­i­can Rice recipe. That bouil­lon con­tains many oth­er ingre­di­ents and fillers. In the future, I hope to update that recipe using toma­to pow­der, instead.

Toma­to Pow­der pro­vides that super-con­cen­trat­ed fresh toma­to fla­vor even when toma­toes are out of sea­son. Toma­toes are also high in nat­ur­al uma­mi glu­ta­mates, so toma­to pow­der amps up the fla­vor in my beef bouillon.

Over time, toma­to pow­der can actu­al­ly start to get cakey and clumpy. no wor­ries, it’s still good. Toss some into your spice grinder or a mor­tar and pes­tle and grind it to pow­der, again. And be sure you are stor­ing it in an air-tight con­tain­er in a dark cab­i­net or pantry.

Check labels to be sure what you buy is only 100% toma­to pow­der, no additives.

What is Tamari Powder?

dried tamari powder in white finger bowl on a concrete countertop with a blue and white print napkin behind.

As I have done more and more gluten free cook­ing, tamari has become a sta­ple liq­uid ingre­di­ent in my fridge. It is a gluten free ver­sion of soy sauce that we use reg­u­lar­ly. Both soy sauce and tamari are high in uma­mi flavor.

My prob­lem was how to get that deli­cious uma­mi fla­vor into a dried beef bouil­lon pow­der. I was thrilled to find I could buy it in a dehy­drat­ed form. I pur­chase mine at Spices, Inc.

Tamari, is the Japan­ese ver­sion of soy sauce. It is a by prod­uct of miso fer­men­ta­tion. (Miso is also high in uma­mi fla­vor.) It pro­vides deep, rich, “meaty” uma­mi fla­vor in so many Asian dish­es, but also in recipes from all around the globe. 

Pow­dered Tamari was anoth­er non-nego­tiable when cre­at­ing this deli­cious beef bouillon.

What is Nutritional Yeast?

nutritional yeast in a bag and in a bowl

Nutri­tion­al yeast is loaded with vit­a­mins, min­er­als and pro­teins and it’s a com­plete­ly nat­ur­al food. It is NOT the same thing as baker’s yeast, for mak­ing bread, or brewer’s yeast; so please don’t try to use either of those as a substitute. 

Nutri­tion­al yeast grows on sug­ar cane and beet molasses. Pro­duc­ers heat the yeast to deac­ti­vate it, after it’s harvested. 

It’s a good source of B vit­a­mins, folate and niacin. It con­tains 18 amino acids, 9 of which make it a com­plete pro­tein. Fiber and glu­tathione are more ben­e­fi­cial com­po­nents of nutri­tion­al yeast. Plus, it’s dairy-free, soy-free and gluten free.

I not only use it in my Home­made Beef Bouil­lon, but also in Home­made Chick­en Bouil­lon, Home­made Taco Sea­son­ing and my famous Gluten Free, Dairy Free Zup­pa Toscana soup! I also use it in the best home­made Veg­etable Broth you will ever eat and in my Cashew Que­so recipe. So, you can see it is def­i­nite­ly a sta­ple in my kitchen.

How to Use Homemade Beef Bouillon

homemade onion dip in a blue ceramic bowl, surrounded by corn chips

How to Make Beef Bouillon Powder

  1. Place all the ingre­di­ents in a smooth­ie blender or your high speed blender.
  2. Blend them togeth­er into a fine powder. 
  3. Store your bouil­lon pow­der in an air­tight con­tain­er in a cool dark pantry or cup­board like all your herbs, sea­son­ings and spices.
Homemade Beef Bouillon Powder in a glass apothecary jar. The lid is off and a heaping Tablespoon of Bouillon powder is sitting on the concrete countertop in front of the jar.  Fantastic Umami Seasoning.

The Recipe

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homemade beef bouillon in an apothecary jar on a concrete counter. A heaping Tablespoon of bouillon sits on the counter in front of the jar.

Homemade Beef Bouillon Powder Recipe


  • Author: Glen­da Embree
  • Total Time: 5 min­utes
  • Yield: 1 1/2 cups 1x
  • Diet: Gluten Free

Description

Home­made Beef Bouil­lon Pow­der is a deli­cious, easy to make uma­mi sea­son­ing that adds deep, rich & savory fla­vor to your favorite recipes!


Ingredients

Scale
  • 4 Table­spoons mush­room pow­der (blend­ed vari­eties or shitake)
  • 2 Table­spoons toma­to powder
  • 2 Table­spoons fine sea salt
  • 2 Table­spoons tamari powder
  • 2 Table­spoons nutri­tion­al yeast
  • 2 Table­spoons onion powder
  • 2 Table­spoons gar­lic powder
  • 1 Table­spoon mus­tard powder
  • 1 Table­spoon oregano
  • 1 Table­spoon black pepper
  • 2 tea­spoons thyme
  • 1 tea­spoon cel­ery seed
  • 1/4 tea­spoon red pep­per flakes
  • 1 bay leaf


Instructions

  1. Place all the ingre­di­ents in a smooth­ie blender or your high speed blender.
  2. Blend them togeth­er into a fine powder.
  3. Store your bouil­lon pow­der in an air­tight con­tain­er in a cool dark pantry or cup­board like all your herbs, sea­son­ings and spices.

Notes

Use home­made beef bouil­lon to add extra uma­mi fla­vor to your favorite beef recipes, to dips, sauces and gravies and so much more.

To use as broth, dis­solve 1 Table­spoon in 1 cup of hot water.

  • Prep Time: 5 min
  • Cook Time: 0 min
  • Cat­e­go­ry: Sea­son­ing Blend
  • Method: Dry Mix
  • Cui­sine: Amer­i­can

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