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Easy Homemade Mayonnaise

easy homemade mayonnaise

Easy Home­made May­on­naise is a rich, creamy condi­ment with a slight tang from lemon and stone ground mus­tard. I’ve been mak­ing may­on­naise for our fam­i­ly for sev­er­al years, now. It’s so easy and I con­trol all the ingre­di­ents. I choose the salt lev­el, the type of fats to use and the fla­vor­ings. There are no dyes, preser­v­a­tives or ingre­di­ents I can’t pronounce.

I was actu­al­ly a may­on­naise hater, until I start­ed mak­ing this at home. There is no com­par­i­son between the fla­vor of Easy Home­made May­on­naise and com­mer­cial may­on­naise. I would encour­age you to make some and then, com­pare. You’ll be a convert!

This post is long, because I want to answer com­mon ques­tions and explain my “whys”, but it actu­al­ly takes me less than 5 min­utes to put this recipe togeth­er. Here’s a quick video of exact­ly how to make it.

I hope you enjoy the recipe as much as we have and it becomes a use­ful tool in your kitchen!

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easy homemade mayonnaise

Easy Homemade Mayonnaise


  • Author: Glen­da Embree
  • Prep Time: 5 min
  • Total Time: 5 min­utes
  • Yield: 2 cups 1x

Ingredients

Scale
  • 2 large eggs
  • 2 cups of avo­ca­do oil (or your pre­ferred oil.  Choose some­thing with light, neu­tral fla­vor.  EVOO is too strong.)
  • 8 ‑or- 14 tea­spoons lemon juice (2 Tbls. + 2 tsp. ‑or- 4 Tbls. +2 tsp.)
  • 2 heap­ing tea­spoons stone ground mustard
  • ½ tea­spoon salt (hold until mayo has set at room temp for 24 hours)

Instructions

  1. Mak­ing the may­on­naise is about a two minute process on the front end. Choose a jar or con­tain­er with a nar­row base. It should­n’t be much larg­er than the bot­tom of your stick blender. I love using can­ning jars, because I will have a lid and don’t need to trans­fer to anoth­er container.
  2. Add your egg to the bot­tom of the jar.
  3. Then, pour the oil over the top. Choose a light, neu­tral fla­vored oil. Extra Vir­gin olive oil is too strong a fla­vor, in my opin­ion. A plain olive oil would be milder if you’re going the olive route. I use avo­ca­do oil, because it is mild-fla­vored, and for what I con­sid­er to be health ben­e­fits. Choose one that works well for your own per­son­al tastes.
  4. Once the egg and oil are in the jar, low­er your stick blender into the con­tain­er and be sure the base is firm­ly flat on the bot­tom of the jar.
  5. Pow­er the stick blender on to low, leav­ing it flat on the bot­tom of the jar. After just a few sec­onds, you will notice the emul­si­fi­ca­tion begin­ning and deli­cious may­on­naise start­ing to creep up the sides of your jar from the bot­tom. (There will still be lots of oil above it.)
  6. Slow­ly, lift the stick blender upward, maybe a quar­ter of an inch at a time. As you notice that lay­er being emul­si­fied, raise it, again. Con­tin­ue that way until all the oil has been com­plete­ly absorbed and all you have left in the jar is thick, creamy may­on­naise. The whole process should take less than two minutes.
  7. At this point, add the lemon juice and stone ground mus­tard. (The amount of lemon juice you choose will depend on how tangy you want your mayo to be and the amount of time you have to let it rest, before using it.  The pH in 8 tea­spoons works if you do a 72 hour, room-tem­per­a­ture rest of your may­on­naise before adding the salt.  If you are only going to do a 24-hour, room tem­per­a­ture rest, you will need a high­er pH lev­el to kill any poten­tial bac­te­ria.  So, the 14 tea­spoons is nec­es­sary.) Thor­ough­ly mix them into your mayo. Just two or three sec­onds with the blender.
  8. Place a lid on your jar and leave it at room tem­per­a­ture for 24 hours.
  9. After 24 hours, stir in the salt and any oth­er sea­son­ings you want. (Think herbs or sriracha. There are tons of pos­si­bil­i­ties. I usu­al­ly use some of it to make a batch of my Avo­ca­do Ranch Sal­ad Dressing.)
  10. Store in the refrig­er­a­tor from here on out.  The mayo will get thick­er as it gets cold.  It will still be loos­er than com­mer­cial may­on­naise, though.

Notes

 

  • Cat­e­go­ry: Condi­ments, Sauces
  • Cui­sine: Amer­i­can

The Tools

This recipe uses a *hand-held stick blender inside a jar or con­tain­er whose base is only big enough for the bot­tom of the blender to fit into it — like a can­ning jar, or the con­tain­er that came with the stick blender.  This small space allows the egg and oil to eas­i­ly emul­si­fy. You don’t have to stand over it and add the oil a drop at a time. (The link, below, is to the stick blender I use. It’s not the fan­ci­est one, but it does every­thing I need.)

*Affiliate Link
Easy Homemade Mayonnaise

While I believe it is prob­a­bly pos­si­ble to make this recipe in a reg­u­lar blender or food proces­sor, the process for that is VERY dif­fer­ent.  I can only speak to my results with mak­ing mayo with a stick blender. If you want to try the blender/food proces­sor method, here’s a blog post, at Inspired Taste, that explains how to do it.

The Ingredients for Homemade Mayonnaise

Tech­ni­cal­ly, you only need three ingre­di­ents for may­on­naise — eggs, oil and an acid, like lemon juice or vine­gar. But, adding mus­tard and even some herbs, will amp up the fla­vors, pro­vide some inter­est­ing vari­ety. After a room-tem­per­a­ture rest peri­od to let the acid do its work, you can also add the salt, which enhances the fla­vor of all the ingre­di­ents. Then store the mayo in the fridge. 

What About Pasteurized Eggs?

To be hon­est, I’ve been unknow­ing­ly mak­ing Easy Home­made May­on­naise, for years, with­out pas­teur­ized eggs. I used to believe that all com­mer­cial eggs are pas­teur­ized. The truth is that most of them are NOT. Mind blown!

I think the odds are remote, that we would eat an infect­ed egg that is also raw. That being said, if you do eat the the 1 in 20,000, or so, that IS infect­ed with sal­mo­nel­la, and serve it raw, you won’t care one bit about the oth­er 19,999 that weren’t con­t­a­m­i­nat­ed. So pas­teur­ized is def­i­nite­ly a great option if you have afford­able access. My prob­lem is where on earth to find them. After sev­er­al weeks of research, I have still only found one com­pa­ny that pas­teur­izes eggs and not only are they cost pro­hib­i­tive, but there are none being sold any­where near my area. 

You can Google “how to pas­teur­ize eggs” and come up with any num­ber of opin­ions and tech­niques. None that I could find could back up their claim with sci­ence. They also could­n’t explain how they KNOW the inter­nal tem­per­a­ture of their egg was at least 136° for the nec­es­sary length of time to kill sal­mo­nel­la or that their method would pre­vent the egg from going past 140°, cook­ing the egg, and mak­ing it use­less for mayonnaise.

So, What’s the Solution?

So, now what? I have done so much read­ing and research, from food blog­gers, to the CDC and FDA, to chefs who should know. There are peo­ple out there, tout­ing their recipes, that will claim that there is no dan­ger from prop­er­ly han­dled eggs. And then, oth­ers who will say it is NEVER safe. After all I have read, and based on my per­son­al expe­ri­ence mak­ing may­on­naise for years, I fall some­where in the middle.

It’s cer­tain­ly true that eat­ing raw eggs may increase the risk of food­borne ill­ness. And it’s also true that raw eggs do some­times har­bor sal­mo­nel­la and oth­er not nice bac­te­ria. For me, per­son­al­ly, how­ev­er, the most sen­si­ble infor­ma­tion I read came from Orange Grove Road and Chef Alton Brown. Both pro­vid­ed infor­ma­tion root­ed in sci­ence and Orange Grove Road pro­vid­ed numer­ous stud­ies to back up what they shared.

lemons

Lemon Juice and a 24-Hour, Room Temperature Rest

After read­ing, those arti­cles and stud­ies, I decid­ed that using the cor­rect amount of acid, and a rest­ing time at room tem­per­a­ture, to obtain a pH lev­el ade­quate to kill the bac­te­ria, was the route I was com­fort­able with. That means I need to use 4–7 tea­spoons of lemon juice per egg, depend­ing on whether I choose the 24-hour or 72-hour rest peri­od. That’s what I do. (If the fin­ished 24-hour mayo is too lemo­ny for your per­son­al taste, the lemon juice can be reduced to as low as 4 tea­spoons per egg. How­ev­er, at that low­er pH, it will require a 72 hour room-tem­per­a­ture rest, for the acid to have time to kill any poten­tial bac­te­ria. So, plan ahead.) 

What I con­clud­ed is that, for my fam­i­ly, a min­i­mal, cal­cu­lat­ed risk (made even less by the prop­er use of acid) is one that makes sense to me. I encour­age you to do your own research and read the avail­able infor­ma­tion. Then make a con­sid­ered deci­sion that is right for you and your own family.

If you decide to go for it, I think you’ll be so pleased with the taste. Easy Home­made May­on­naise is the BOMB! My hus­band prefers it to all oth­er condi­ments! lol I use home­made mayo to make pota­to sal­ad or pas­ta sal­ad, in sand­wich­es and to make home­made sal­ad dress­ings. It’s a key ingre­di­ent in recipes like Mex­i­can Street Corn, Lob­ster Rolls and Dev­iled Eggs. I don’t hes­i­tate to use it in ANY of my own recipes, either.

How to Make Easy Homemade Mayonnaise

Mak­ing the may­on­naise is about a two minute process on the front end. Choose a jar or con­tain­er with a nar­row base. It should­n’t be much larg­er than the bot­tom of your stick blender. I love using can­ning jars, because I will have a lid and don’t need to trans­fer to anoth­er container.

avocado oil

Add your egg to the bot­tom of the jar. Then, pour the oil over the top. Choose a light, neu­tral fla­vored oil. Extra Vir­gin olive oil is too strong a fla­vor, in my opin­ion. A plain olive oil would be milder if you’re going the olive route. I use avo­ca­do oil, because it is mild-fla­vored, and for what I con­sid­er to be health ben­e­fits. Choose one that works well for your own per­son­al tastes.

Using the Stick Blender

Once the egg and oil are in the jar, low­er your stick blender into the con­tain­er and be sure the base is firm­ly flat on the bot­tom of the jar. Pow­er the stick blender on to low, leav­ing it flat on the bot­tom of the jar. After just a few sec­onds, you will notice the emul­si­fi­ca­tion begin­ning and deli­cious may­on­naise start­ing to creep up the sides of your jar from the bot­tom. (There will still be lots of oil above it.)

Slow­ly, lift the stick blender upward, maybe a quar­ter of an inch at a time. As you notice that lay­er being emul­si­fied, raise it, again. Con­tin­ue that way until all the oil has been com­plete­ly absorbed and all you have left in the jar is thick, creamy may­on­naise. The whole process should take less than two minutes.

At this point, add the lemon juice and stone ground mus­tard. Thor­ough­ly mix them into your mayo. (Just two or three sec­onds with the blender.)

easy homemade mayonnaise

Place a lid on your jar and leave it at room tem­per­a­ture for 24 hours. After 24 hours, stir in the salt and any oth­er sea­son­ings you want. (Think herbs or sriracha, roast­ed gar­lic or jalapeno lime. There are tons of pos­si­bil­i­ties. I usu­al­ly use some of it to make a batch of my Avo­ca­do Ranch Sal­ad Dress­ing.) Your Easy Home­made May­on­naise is ready to eat and enjoy. Store it in the refrig­er­a­tor from this point on. It will thick­en as it gets cold.

Enjoy, my friend! A whole new world of deli­cious­ness awaits!

More Delicious Homemade Condiments to Try

5- Minute Home­made Ketchup

Homemade Ketchup

Easy Home­made Chimichurri

homemade chimichurri
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2 thoughts on “Easy Homemade Mayonnaise”

    • Hi WG! I am def­i­nite­ly not a sci­en­tist. I don’t know whether adding acid low­ers or rais­es the pH lev­el in mayo. I do know that in the infor­ma­tion I have read, how­ev­er, my under­stand­ing is that it brings it to the cor­rect pH to kill the bac­te­ria we are try­ing to get rid of. Thanks so much for your com­ments and for tak­ing the time to stop and vis­it. I hope to “see” you around the blog, again. Have a won­der­ful­ly blessed Christmas!

      Reply

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